Endocannabinoid System

FAAH Mutation & Pain Insensitivity

There are curious cases of people who feel no pain or have extreme resistance to discomfort. These individuals are often studied by researchers who hope to develop better methods of pain management. One such woman was discovered after she recovered from a highly painful wrist surgery using Tylenol alone. As researchers at the University College of London found out, she had a history of this sort of endurance, and it appeared to have been passed on to her son. With her consent, they ran genetic tests, identifying two mutation in genes related to FAAH.

Negative Synergy

There is little evidence to show a directly harmful effect of cannabis in pregnancy. However, cannabinoids consistently amplify the toxic effects of nicotine and alcohol on the fetus. Preclinical research suggests one possible reason: activating the CB2

CB1 Kinetics

When a receptor is overactive — because of a drug or disease — the body attempts to normalize activity by internalizing the receptor, hiding it from molecules at the cell surface. Internalization is a key homeostatic mechanism. But a receptor’s degree of activation doesn’t perfectly parallel the subsequent internalization.

Big Bellies: Pregnancy & Obesity

A mother’s diet while she’s pregnant is known to affect the child’s eventual food preferences. A new animal study from scientists in the U.S. and Brazil examines how a high-fat diet during pregnancy influences the offspring’s predisposition to obesity and related complications later in life, and this appears to be mediated by changes in the

ABHD6, an Exceptional Enzyme

2-AG is the most abundant endocannabinoid. It is derived from the lipid membrane that separates a cell from its environment — a cell will cut 2-AG out of its membrane, allowing the molecule to drift to neighboring cells. Upon meeting those neighbors, it slips into their membrane, where it binds to

CB2 in Breast Cancer

Breast cancers are often classified by the receptors they express. The three most common breast cancer receptors respond to estrogen, progesterone, or epidermal growth factor. The latter include HER2-positive breast cancers. Identifying these receptors facilitates treatment. A study led by scientists in Spain indicates that the