Quick Hits

Welcome to Project CBD Quick Hits, where we collect some of the most interesting and informative tidbits of research into cannabis over the past week.
Posted: January 1, 2020
Two dropper bottles lay on an aqua background. Their pink labels read "Acid" and "LSD," respectively.
One of the biggest issues with an unregulated drug market is the presence of adulterants. Many of the adulterants found in samples of LSD are potentially lethal - unlike the drug they intend to mimic. Read more
Posted: November 26, 2019
A rat looks out of a hear-shaped hole in a pink background.
Uruguayan researchers found that a low dose of cannabisinfo-icon increased some mating behaviors, a high dose reduced them, and any dose increased sensitivity to pleasurable touch.  Read more
Posted: November 15, 2019
A cannabis leaf sits on the middle console of a car with a car key laid on top. There's a sun spot in the upper left hand corner of the photograph.
High cannabisinfo-icon users consistently drive more slowly than those who don’t use. And when users aren’t high, they drive more cautiously and consistently than non-users. Researchers try to make this sound like a bad thing. Read more
Posted: November 14, 2019
Three happy students looking at you with thumbs up in an university campus.
A letter published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) highlighted that legalizing adult use of cannabisinfo-icon is correlated with lower rates of teen use. Read more
Posted: November 5, 2019
An illustration of a person in a white hazmat suit with a backpack-style sprayer on their back. They are standing and spraying on an aqua background.
The EPA has refused to provide pesticide regulations for the cannabisinfo-icon industry. So states have to create their own regulations by banning and “recommending” the pesticides they deem appropriate. A new study examines batches of cannabis that failed pesticide screening in Oregon.  Read more

More quick hits

Posted: February 11, 2019
Image on an insect on a plant

A new article from the California Department of Pesticide Regulations (CDPR) warns of the dangers of cannabis because it may be contaminated with organophosphate pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, glyphosate). The CDPR walks through what could happen if a pregnant woman uses chlorpyrifos-contaminated cannabis.

Posted: February 11, 2019
Illustration of human lungs
Activating the CB2 receptor ameliorated nicotine-induced fibrosis, while blocking the receptor exacerbated the problem.
Posted: February 11, 2019
Image of doctor measuring BMI

In spite of the munchies, using THC-rich cannabis is associated with lower weight and a smaller risk for Type II diabetes. This is well substantiated by human epidemiology and research.

Posted: January 24, 2019
Image of a smiling young boy

In his first article of the new year, Raphael Mechoulam and other Israeli scientists look at the “real life experiences of medical

Posted: January 24, 2019
Abstract illustration of a person viewing into a mind

A study in Molecular Psychiatry with tens of thousands of people found an association between ADHD and cannabis use. Their data suggests that ADHD causes later cannabis use, which may support the notion that THC is used to self medicate (although ADHD is associated with heavier use of many drugs).

Posted: January 24, 2019
Image illustrating a woman with abdominal pain

Endometriosis is a poorly-understood condition causing severe chronic pain and alterations in a woman’s menstrual cycle. As an understudied disease, treatment is limited. Scientists surveyed over 400 Australian women to see what actions they took to treat their pelvic pain.

Posted: January 24, 2019

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to numerous problems, including alcoholism and suicide. New findings indicate that endocannabinoids aid TBI recovery: When researchers boosted 2-AG levels shortly after injury, rats displayed less anxiety and less interest in alcohol. This is significant since alcoholism is a serious comorbidity of brain injury.

Posted: January 24, 2019
Image of cannabinoid crystals

Across political boundaries, a group of scientists from Russia, China, and the USA crystallized the CB2 cannabinoidinfo-icon