Quick Hits

Welcome to Project CBD Quick Hits, where we collect some of the most interesting and informative tidbits of research into cannabis over the past week.
Posted: January 1, 2020
Two dropper bottles lay on an aqua background. Their pink labels read "Acid" and "LSD," respectively.
One of the biggest issues with an unregulated drug market is the presence of adulterants. Many of the adulterants found in samples of LSD are potentially lethal - unlike the drug they intend to mimic. Read more
Posted: November 26, 2019
A rat looks out of a hear-shaped hole in a pink background.
Uruguayan researchers found that a low dose of cannabis increased some mating behaviors, a high dose reduced them, and any dose increased sensitivity to pleasurable touch.  Read more
Posted: November 15, 2019
A cannabis leaf sits on the middle console of a car with a car key laid on top. There's a sun spot in the upper left hand corner of the photograph.
High cannabis users consistently drive more slowly than those who don’t use. And when users aren’t high, they drive more cautiously and consistently than non-users. Researchers try to make this sound like a bad thing. Read more
Posted: November 14, 2019
Three happy students looking at you with thumbs up in an university campus.
A letter published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) highlighted that legalizing adult use of cannabis is correlated with lower rates of teen use. Read more
Posted: November 5, 2019
An illustration of a person in a white hazmat suit with a backpack-style sprayer on their back. They are standing and spraying on an aqua background.
The EPA has refused to provide pesticide regulations for the cannabis industry. So states have to create their own regulations by banning and “recommending” the pesticides they deem appropriate. A new study examines batches of cannabis that failed pesticide screening in Oregon.  Read more

More quick hits

Posted: April 9, 2019

When a receptor is overactive — because of a drug or disease — the body attempts to normalize activity by internalizing the receptor, hiding it from molecules at the cell surface. Internalization is a key homeostatic mechanism. But a receptor’s degree of activation doesn’t perfectly parallel the subsequent internalization.

Posted: April 8, 2019

A synthetic cannabinoid pharmaceutical called Rimonabant was briefly approved in Europe as an anti-obesity drug. Rimonabant inhibits the CB1

Posted: April 3, 2019

A mother’s diet while she’s pregnant is known to affect the child’s eventual food preferences. A new animal study from scientists in the U.S. and Brazil examines how a high-fat diet during pregnancy influences the offspring’s predisposition to obesity and related complications later in life, and this appears to be mediated by changes in the

Posted: April 3, 2019

The endocannabinoid system forms part of what makes us feel pleasure — from the runner’s high, eating good food, and according to new research singing. Saoirse O’Sullivan’s group at University of Nottingham (UK) examined the effects of singing and dancing on endocannabinoid levels.

Posted: April 3, 2019

2-AG is the most abundant endocannabinoid. It is derived from the lipid membrane that separates a cell from its environment — a cell will cut 2-AG out of its membrane, allowing the molecule to drift to neighboring cells. Upon meeting those neighbors, it slips into their membrane, where it binds to

Posted: April 3, 2019
Increased consideration of the public health impact of legalization has led to a closer look at cannabis’ impact on obesity. New research from Michigan supports an association between cannabis use and lower BMI.
Posted: April 3, 2019
Danish researchers have found that cannabis users with schizophrenia experienced significantly fewer gut-related issues than those of non-cannabis users.
Posted: March 27, 2019
Large doses of THC, CBD, and CBN could make processing some blood pressure drugs and Ritalin more difficult. Most of these cannabinoids aren’t consumed at doses large enough to affect the process but patients using large doses of CBD should monitor the metabolism of other drugs they’re taking.
Posted: March 27, 2019
Ohio researchers found Chron’s Disease symptoms were 40-70% lower in patients using cannabis than non-users.
Posted: March 27, 2019

Last week we wrote about a study on CBD and cancer. The authors suggested that CBD was fighting cancer cells by blocking a receptor called GPR55.

Posted: March 27, 2019

The endocannabinoid system is fundamental to addiction, but not in obvious ways. All sorts of cannabinoids appear to have anti-addictive properties: CBD, THCV, Rimonabant, THC.

Posted: March 27, 2019

The kidneys are a workhorse of the body, filtering nutrients from toxins. Oily cannabinoids like THC and CBD slip out of the kidneys’ filtration system, but they stop to interact with cannabinoid receptors that regulate kidney function.

Posted: March 18, 2019
cancer cell and lab tray with dropper

Scientists in at Western New England University in Springfield, Massachusetts, briefly review 10 studies that shed light on how CBD might interact with cancer treatments.

Posted: March 18, 2019

Sometimes, science fails to see the tree for the forest. Statistical significance and double-blind trials are important, but so is human experience. Case studies are meaningful. Case studies often portend future discovery. So the case study of two Brazilian brain cancer patients who successfully combined CBD with their cancer treatment should not be dismissed. In their report, Paula Dall’Stella and other doctors in São Paulo describe the typical treatment plan for patients with glioblastoma.

Posted: March 18, 2019

Breast cancers are often classified by the receptors they express. The three most common breast cancer receptors respond to estrogen, progesterone, or epidermal growth factor. The latter include HER2-positive breast cancers. Identifying these receptors facilitates treatment. A study led by scientists in Spain indicates that the

Posted: March 18, 2019
blue and yellow drawing of lungs

Doctors in the UK recently reported the case of an elderly man who’s lung cancer responded to CBD. The man — being 81 years old — decided against chemotherapy or radiation, which would worsen his quality of life without much hope for extending it. Four months after a CT scan, the tumor cross section had shrunk to nearly one tenth of its initial size! The doctors — obviously surprised — found out that the patient had begun using a CBD oil 2-3 months earlier.

Posted: March 18, 2019

An “orphan receptor” is the term for a receptor in the body whose natural activator is not known.

Posted: March 18, 2019

The first medical use of THC allowed by the FDA was the 1985 approval of isolate THC (Marinol) to treat nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy.

Posted: March 12, 2019

Cannabidiol (CBD) is an astonishingly safe drug. Currently, the biggest safety concern is that at high doses it can alter the metabolism of other pharmaceuticals. That means CBD might amplify the toxicity of other drugs.

Posted: March 12, 2019

In clinical research, cannabis is often set up to fail. Federal restrictions privilege studying isolated molecules from cannabis over the plant itself. And even when cannabis research is done, scientists are often forced to use low-quality weed from the National Institute of Drug Abuse.