Adrian Devitt-Lee

Profile photograph of Adrian Devitt-Lee. He is looking off into the distance, standing in front of a pastoral scene.

Adrian Devitt-Lee is Project CBD’s chief science writer and a PhD candidate in applied math at the University College in London. He is the co-author of several articles in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Physiology, F1000Research, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, and Physica A.

CBD & Liver Damage

Warning about the dangers of drinking over 10 bottles of Epidiolex at once adds nothing useful to the discussion.

Cannabis in Hospice Care

The elderly are the fastest growing population of cannabis users. But how do hospice workers feel about their patients using cannabis? A recent survey by pharmacists at the University of Maryland asked palliative care practitioners about their opinions on cannabis use among hospice patients. Over 90% of workers support the use of cannabis, but most physicians did not recommend cannabis to their patients. This may be due to a lack of knowledge about safe use of cannabis — over 80% of respondents wanted standardized protocols on the use of cannabis in palliative care.

Preventing Pain with Orphan Receptors

Black man covering his eyes

Phytocannabinoids consistently confuse scientists because of the multiplicity of their actions. CBD, for example, binds to a handful of neurotransmitter receptors, as well as hormone receptors, ion channels, and a variety of enzymes. Receptors without a known endogenous ligand are called “orphan” receptors. GPR18 is involved in ocular-pressure (and hence glaucoma treatment) as well as cardiovascular function.

CB1 & Learning

Mouse with books and glasses
If THC makes people forgetful while they’re high, one might reasonably expect that blocking the CB1 receptor that mediates the high will promote focus and the ability to learn. But is this true?

Exercise for Depression

Man running on beach

It’s increasingly recognized that the runner’s high, which used to be attributed to endorphins, is conferred partly by endocannabinoids in the brain. In response to the stress of exercise, the brain produces anandamide, “the bliss chemical” which provides that feeling of elation along with pain reduction and health benefits. A collaboration between researchers in Wisconsin and at Iowa State University has sought to understand this phenomenon in women suffering from depression.

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