Adrian Devitt-Lee

Photo of Adrian Devitt-Lee
Adrian Devitt-Lee, winner of the Norbert Wiener Award in Mathematics, graduated from Tufts University with a MS in Math and a BA in Chemistry. He is the co-author of several articles in peer-reviewed publications, including the Journal of Physiology, F1000Research, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, and Physica A. Devitt-Lee’s report on cannabinoid-pharmaceutical interactions was published in Sonoma Medicine. As a R&D intern with Medicinal Genomics, he identified mutations in the CBDA synthase gene in plant varieties. He also performed cell culture, time-lapse microscopy, flow cytometry and RNA extraction on cancer cells as an intern with the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. As a senior research associate with CannaCraft, Inc., Devitt-Lee researched pesticide and solvent safety and provided regulatory input to California government officials. He has written numerous articles for projectcbd.org.

Coffee and Cannabis

Coffee and cannabis are two of the most widely used psychoactive substances in the world. Whereas cannabis is often consumed to relax the body, enhance perception, and stimulate creativity, coffee – like tea and other caffeinated beverages – is typically used to energize and help people focus, particularly in the face of exhaustion.

Does it make sense to consume cannabis and coffee together? How do they interact? Is it fitting that decriminalized THC-rich cannabis was first sold over-the-counter in Amsterdam’s coffee shops?

Bugs, Mold and Excrement

On November 16, 2017, California officials released a new set of regulations for cannabis manufacturing, testing, and growing. In many respects, these updates are a significant improvement to the initial draft regulations, however, some major problems remain. 

Two important issues pertain to regulations on mold and foreign filth, which are absurdly loose. And unlike the initial proposal, no statement as to the rationale behind the new regulations has been released.

Fire, Brimstone & Dioxin

Fire and cannabis

The October firestorms raging in Northern California have incinerated nearly a quarter million acres and displaced more than 100,000 residents. Heavy smoke has blanketed the skies in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, poisoning the air to an unprecedented degree and prompting air quality alerts and health advisories throughout the region.

“We have never recorded higher levels of air pollution in the Bay Area,” said air district spokeswoman Kristine Roselius.